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Template:Orders of magnitude

This is a tabulated listing of the orders of magnitude in relation to pressure expressed in parcals

Magnitude Pressure lbf/in2 Sound Pressure Item
10−15 Pa
1 fPa -206.0206 dB Interstellar space pressure (approximate)
10−11 Pa
13.3 pPa -123.543567 dB Lowest obtainable pressure in laboratory conditions (as of January 2009).[1]
10−9 Pa
1 nPa -86.0206 dB Atmospheric pressure on the Moon (approximate)
See also: Error: Template must be given at least one article name
1 nPa 1 nPa -86.0206 dB vacuum expected in the beam pipe of the Large Hadron Collider's Atlas experiment
10−6 Pa
1 µPa -26.0206 dB Pressure inside a vacuum tube (approximate, varies). Reference pressure for sound in water.
10 µPa -6.0206 dB Radiation pressure of sunlight on a perfectly reflecting surface at the distance of the Earth.[2]
20 µPa 0 dB Threshold of human hearing - the smallest RMS pressure fluctuation that the human ear can hear in a noiseless environment, at frequencies between 1 kHz and 5 kHz.

Reference pressure for sound in air.

100 µPa 100 µPa 13.9794 dB Near earth outer spacepressure (approximate)
10−3 Pa
0.5 mPa 27.9588 dB Atmospheric pressure on Pluto (1988 figure; very roughly)
1 Pa
1 Pa 93.9794 dB Pressure exerted by a UK five pound note resting on a surface [3]
10 Pa 113.9794 dB Pressure increase per millimeter of a water column at Earth mean sea level.
10 Pa 113.9794 dB Pressure inside an incandescent light bulb (approximate)
100 Pa 133.9794 dB Threshold of pain. Sounds above this amplitude are unbearable and can cause ear pain. Prolonged exposure may lead to hearing loss.
103 Pa
1 kPa 0.145 psi 153.9794 dB Atmospheric pressure on Mars, 1 % of atmospheric sea-level pressure on Earth
10 kPa 1.45 psi 173.9794 dB Pressure increase per meter of a water column1, or the drop in air pressure when going from earth sea level to 1000 m elevation
101.325 kPa 14.696 psi 194.093732 dB Standard atmospheric pressure for earth sea level
180 to 250 kPa 26 to 36 psi 199.08485 to 201.9382 dB Air pressure in an automobile tire relative to atmosphere (gauge pressure)
407 to 607 kPa 59 to 88 psi 206.171288 to 209.643174 dB Air pressure in a champagne bottle[4].
600 to 800 kPa 209.542425 to 212.0412 dB Air pressure in a bicycle tire relative to atmosphere (gauge pressure)
690 to 828 kPa 100 to 120 psi 210.756382 to 212.340007 dB Air pressure in a heavy truck/bus tire relative to atmosphere (gauge pressure)
106 Pa
0.8 to 2 MPa 120 to 290 psi 212.0412 to 220 dB Pressure used in boilers of steam locomotives
9 MPa 1305 psi 233.06425 dB Atmospheric pressure on Venus (90 bar)
10 MPa 1450 psi 233.9794 dB Pressure washers force out water at this pressure
12 MPa 1740 psi 235.563025 dB Pressure exerted by a 60 kg woman wearing stilettos
20 MPa 2900 psi 240 dB Pressure of a typical aluminium scuba tank or pressurized gas cylinders. (200 bar)
100 MPa 14500 psi 253.9794 dB Pressure at bottom of Mariana Trench, about 10 km below ocean surface (1000 bar)
400 MPa 266.0206 dB Chamber pressure of .50 BMG weapon discharge
600 MPa 269.542425 dB Water pressure used in a water jet cutter.
109 Pa
9 GPa 293.06425 dB Pressure at which octaoxygen forms [5] (90000 bar)
18 GPa 299.08485 dB Pressure needed for the first commercially successful synthesis of diamond
96 GPa 313.624825 dB Pressure at which metallic oxygen forms[6] (960000 bar)
100 GPa 313.9794 dB Theoretical tensile strength of a carbon nanotube (CNT)
380 GPa 325.575072 dB Pressure inside the core of the Earth (3.8 million bar)
1012 Pa
530 TPa 388.464917 dB Pressure inside an Ivy Mike-like nuclear bomb detonation (5.3 billion bar)
1015 Pa
6.4 PPa 410.103 dB Pressure inside a W80 nuclear warhead detonation (64 billion bar)
25 PPa 421.9382 dB Pressure inside the core of the Sun.[7] (250 billion bar)
10111 Pa 4.63 × 10113 Pa 2367.29102 dB The Planck pressure (4.63x10108 Bar)

CitationsEdit

  1. Ishimaru, H. (1989). "Ultimate Pressure of the Order of 10-13 Torr in an Aluminum Alloy Vacuum Chamber". Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology 7 (3): 2439–2442. 
  2. G. Vulpetti, L. Johnson, G. L. Matloff, Solar Sails: A Novel Approach to Interplanetary Flight, Springer, August 2008
  3. "Microbe experiment suggests we could all be Martians", The Guardian 2007-01-13, accessed 2008-03-23
  4. The Physics Factbook
  5. Template:Harvtxt
  6. azonano.com 2008
  7. Williams, David R. (September 1, 2004). "Sun Fact Sheet". NASA. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.

ReferencesEdit